Botanical garden visited!

On Thursday  we( my student and I) had to take the train in to Wellington.

We made arrangements earlier in the week to visit the Botanical garden in Wellington!

Arriving at the station –

No train!

The lady in the ticket office told us a bus would take us.

The bus picked us up and we had to stop at every station to pick people up.

Were there people!?

Many, many wanted to go to Wellington in the 10 o’clock train(bus).

School holidays!

It took us a bit longer than using the train.

Arriving in Wellington we went to the cable car.

It took us to the top of the hill.

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We walked down the hill and saw the following!

 

Very windy and cloudy also cold at first.

We enjoyed the day.

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Springtime at last?

 

 

 

 

I have to share something beautiful with you all!

The cherry trees are in full bloom.

This year they are covered in white

welcoming

SPRING.

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DIS HEERLIKE LENTE

Woorde: THEO W. JANDRELL en G.G. CILLIÉ
Musiek: Wysie uit die Alpe; verwerk: G.G. CILLIÉ

Dis heerlike lente, die winter’s verby;

weer nooi berg’ en klowe vir jou en vir my.

Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o. Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o!
Die bergklim is heerlik, dit hou mens gesond.

Die vroe-, vroeë môre het goud in die mond.

Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o. Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o!

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/tag/dis-heerlike-lente-lirieke/

 

Chocolate Cosmos

This time of the year all plants are showing off their beautiful flowers.

CHOCOLATE COSMOS

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The alluring, strong chocolate fragrance of this sunloving, bushy perennial is intriguing! From midsummer into fall these velvety, deep burgundy, 1 ½ to 2″ flowers bloom for weeks atop slender 10-15″ tall stems. Superb as a container plant; outstanding as a cut flower.

http://www.michiganbulb.com/product/Chocolate_Cosmos/Other_Sun_Perennials?p=0838206&utm_source=msn&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=IDS_Products&utm_term=Chocolate%20Cosmos&CAPCID=3588670165&CA_6C15C=120013880000143146

JOCKEY CAP

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Tigridia pavonia

Common Name: Jockey Caps. Sword-shaped, ribbed leaves. Triangular shaped flowers of White, Red, Rose or Yellow – with many colour combinations inbetween!http://www.egmontseeds.co.nz/flowers/tigridia-jockey-caps-modern-hybrids

FUCHSIAS 

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Fuchsia fans know how much fun it is to pot up a small plant and watch it grow in just a few weeks, into a stunning plant with flowers that resemble tiny ballerinas dancing down the sides of a hanging basket, or standard, or bush.
Luckily for fuchsia novices, this joy requires very little skill or hard work.

http://gardens.co.nz/Articles.cfm?NLID=125

Kappertjie/ Nastartium : Flower power

KAPPERTJIE 

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Tropaeolum /trɵˈpələm/,[1] commonly known as nasturtium (/næˈstɜrʃ(i)əm/;[2] literally “nose-twister” or “nose-tweaker”), is a genus of roughly 80 species of annual and perennial herbaceous flowering plants. It was named by Carl Linnaeus and is the only genus in the family Tropaeolaceae. The nasturtiums received their common name because they produce an oil that is similar to that of watercress(Nasturtium officinale).

The genus Tropaeolumnative to South and Central America, includes several very popular garden plants, the most commonly grown being T. majusT. peregrinum and T. speciosum. The hardiest species is T. polyphyllum from Chile, the perennial roots of which can survive underground when air temperatures drop as low as −15°C (5°F).

Plants in this genus have showy, often intensely bright flowers, and rounded, peltate (shield-shaped) leaves with the petiole in the centre. The flowers have five petals (sometimes more), a three-carpelled ovary, and a funnel-shaped nectar tube at the back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropaeolum

 

Gladioli : Flower power

Gladiolus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The genus Gladiolus contains about 260 species, of which 250 are native to sub-Saharan Africa, mostly South Africa. About 10 species are native to Eurasia. There are 160 species of Gladiolus endemic in southern Africa and 76 in tropical Africa. The flowers of unmodified wild species vary from very small to perhaps 40 mm across, and inflorescences bearing anything from one to several flowers. The spectacular giant flower spikes in commerce are the products of centuries of hybridisation, selection, and perhaps more drastic manipulation.

I have some gladioli in my small back yard.

Gladioli are half-hardy in temperate climates. They grow from rounded, symmetrical corms, that are enveloped in several layers of brownish, fibrous tunics.

Their stems are generally unbranched, producing 1 to 9 narrow, sword-shaped, longitudinal grooved leaves, enclosed in a sheath. The lowest leaf is shortened to a cataphyll. The leaf blades can be plane or cruciform in cross section.