Botanical garden visited!

On Thursday  we( my student and I) had to take the train in to Wellington.

We made arrangements earlier in the week to visit the Botanical garden in Wellington!

Arriving at the station –

No train!

The lady in the ticket office told us a bus would take us.

The bus picked us up and we had to stop at every station to pick people up.

Were there people!?

Many, many wanted to go to Wellington in the 10 o’clock train(bus).

School holidays!

It took us a bit longer than using the train.

Arriving in Wellington we went to the cable car.

It took us to the top of the hill.

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We walked down the hill and saw the following!

 

Very windy and cloudy also cold at first.

We enjoyed the day.

Springtime at last?

 

 

 

 

I have to share something beautiful with you all!

The cherry trees are in full bloom.

This year they are covered in white

welcoming

SPRING.

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DIS HEERLIKE LENTE

Woorde: THEO W. JANDRELL en G.G. CILLIÉ
Musiek: Wysie uit die Alpe; verwerk: G.G. CILLIÉ

Dis heerlike lente, die winter’s verby;

weer nooi berg’ en klowe vir jou en vir my.

Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o. Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o!
Die bergklim is heerlik, dit hou mens gesond.

Die vroe-, vroeë môre het goud in die mond.

Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o. Hol-la-dri-o-ha, hol-la-dri-o!

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/tag/dis-heerlike-lente-lirieke/

 

Papaver nudicaule

 

Papaver nudicaule

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
he Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule, syn. Papaver croceum, P. miyabeanum,[2][3] P. amurense, and P. macounii) is a borealflowering plant. Native to subpolar regions of Europe, Asia and North America, and the mountains of Central Asia[4] (but not in Iceland), Iceland poppies are hardy but short-lived perennials, often grown as biennials, that yield large, papery, bowl-shaped, lightly fragrant flowers supported by hairy, one foot, curved stems among feathery blue-green foliage 1-6 inches long. They were first described by botanists in 1759. The wild species blooms in white or yellow, and is hardy from USDA Zones 3a-10b. All parts of this plant are likely to be poisonous,[5] containing (like all poppies) toxic alkaloids. In particular, P. nudicaule has been shown to contain the benzophenanthidine alkaloid, chelidonine.[6] It also contains (+)-amurine, (-)-amurensinine, (-)-O-methylthalisopavine, (-)-flavinantine and (-)-amurensine.[7]
POPPIES

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