Papaver nudicaule

 

Papaver nudicaule

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
he Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule, syn. Papaver croceum, P. miyabeanum,[2][3] P. amurense, and P. macounii) is a borealflowering plant. Native to subpolar regions of Europe, Asia and North America, and the mountains of Central Asia[4] (but not in Iceland), Iceland poppies are hardy but short-lived perennials, often grown as biennials, that yield large, papery, bowl-shaped, lightly fragrant flowers supported by hairy, one foot, curved stems among feathery blue-green foliage 1-6 inches long. They were first described by botanists in 1759. The wild species blooms in white or yellow, and is hardy from USDA Zones 3a-10b. All parts of this plant are likely to be poisonous,[5] containing (like all poppies) toxic alkaloids. In particular, P. nudicaule has been shown to contain the benzophenanthidine alkaloid, chelidonine.[6] It also contains (+)-amurine, (-)-amurensinine, (-)-O-methylthalisopavine, (-)-flavinantine and (-)-amurensine.[7]
POPPIES

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Yellow Poppies

http://printsensephotography.com/2012/06/17/summer-a-haiku/

Sherene had the most beautiful photos of red poppies on her post. You may as well have a look. I told her that we have some yellow popies that are open here in the Council gardens and on the round about.

My biggest problem is that the weather does not want to clear enough so I can take some photos of them.

This morning I decided come rain, come snow I am going to take some photos of the YELLOW poppies.

One patch along the road.

All the heads of the flowers were blown away from me.

I had to turn it facing me so that I could take a better photo.

I had to step onto the curb and nearly into the wet flowerbed to take this photo.

Another photo of the round about. This is only a small one.

There is another round about which is bigger and has more flowers.

Problem is you can’t walk up to the flowers. Cars won’t stop to let you do it!

The Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule syn. Papaver croceum, P. amurense, P. miyabeanum, and P. macounii) is a borealflowering plant. Native to subpolar regions of northern Europe and North America, Iceland poppies are hardy but short-livedperennials, often grown as biennials, that yield large, papery, bowl-shaped, lightly fragrant flowers supported by hairy, one foot, curved stems among feathery blue-green foliage 1-6 inches long. They were first described by botanists in 1759.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papaver_nudicaule